15 February, 2012

5,500 K

A few months ago I was contacted by Lighting Designer Nancy Goldstein's office to inquire about how I work. After forwarding my information, I kind of chuckled because well aren't I the anti-lighting designer's photographer? I photo shop just about every recessed light I can and generally get so frustrated with these fancy computer controlled lighting systems that give me three options "evening", "home" or "party". I don't want to party I want to dim the sconces and only the sconces, please.
Over the past year I've been turning off more lights than I turn on because to me it's more natural and why would the lights be on anyway, it's obviously a bright sunny day?


So Nancy and I spoke a few more times and then we met at a project of hers, a music room with 20' ceilings. As we waited outside (for the Architect to let us in) we talked about kelvin, no not a mutual friend, but the (color) temperature of how light is measured. 


What I learned very quickly was Nancy's passion, sensitive understanding and intelligent approach to light is well enlightening! Nancy Goldstein loves lighting, actually became more animated as she explained the lighting to me. But what really won me over? Well after every light had been illuminated, I said; so can I control those sconces, separately from the recessed fixtures? Yes. In fact I had more control over each individual light fixture than ever before. 




We scheduled the shoot for late afternoon as the temperature of the light outside was very important to the balance of light inside. And while I'll think twice the next time I start to clone stamp out a recessed light (don't worry designers, I'll still get rid of them;). I will pause and wonder how Nancy would have lit that space because, Nancy Goldstein really knows how to light up a room, in more ways than one.


Warm Regards,


Michael J. Lee

1 comment:

MBishop said...

Fantastic space! It would be great to see photos during different times of the day. Good lighting can make a huge difference. Being an architect it is always exciting to see a well done professional job.

Mira Bishop

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